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As you can read in the bar chart above, there are actually six Equal Pay Days. For example, in November every year we bring attention to the gender-based inequity in wages for Latinas, but this inequity intersects with other identities, including race and ethnicity. Each of the days represents the amount of time into the NEXT YEAR that a woman in each group would have to work to earn the same amount of money a non-Hispanic white man, doing the same job, earned the previous year. Latina women work more almost an entire extra year to earn what non-Hispanic white men doing the same work earn in one year.

On average nationally, this is what women earn compared to White, non-Hispanic Men:

(above data from equalpaytoday.org/equalpaydays)

The gender pay gap is more than just a statistic – it affects real women and real families. The gender pay gap causes real damages and perpetuates income inequality for women of color. Latinas would be making $26,095 more on average each year if there were no gender pay gap. This adds up to 3.7 year's worth of food for their families, approximately 12,342 more gallons of gas, or 27 more months of rent each year.  This amount of money could allow a Latina and her family to rise above the poverty line or jump from one socioeconomic tier to another.

READ THESE BOOKS to dig deeper to help close the wage gaps:

This hands-on manual provides Latinas with the tools they need to succeed at work by examining some of the societal and cultural obstacles that hinder their progress.

This hands-on manual provides Latinas with the tools they need to succeed at work by examining some of the societal and cultural obstacles that hinder their progress.

"Policy makers can take a number of critical lessons from the analyses in this volume"

"Policy makers can take a number of critical lessons from the analyses in this volume"

“How can women and their families get ahead when they’re getting undercut and shortchanged?” -Kirsten Gillibrand, U.S. Senator for New York State

“How can women and their families get ahead when they’re getting undercut and shortchanged?”
-Kirsten Gillibrand, U.S. Senator for New York State

La Cumbre advocates

La Cumbre advocates for a wide range of economic justice issues affecting Latinas, from the sticky floor of poverty to opportunities that crack the glass ceiling.  These include welfare reform, livable wages, job discrimination, pay equity, housing, social security, pension reform, and much more.